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Twitter outraged by Philadelphia man’s post-Ida backflip off bridge into record flooding

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The potentially disease-ridden waters haven’t deterred a single Philadelphia man making his way into record flooding waters in the wake of Tropical Storm Ida this week.

The incident, which was captured on video and has since gone viral on Twitter, sparked reactions of disbelief, excitement and people pointing out how the floodwaters were brimming with viruses and bacteria.

Footage shows the man climbing the fence of a freeway overpass on 22nd Street in the Center City neighborhood.

He is dressed only in a swimsuit and then performs the backflip before landing with his feet first in the water.

The potentially disease-ridden waters didn’t drive a single man out of Philadelphia who made his way to record flood waters

The man, who has yet to be identified, swims away after completing the dive.

The viral post drew reactions from some famous personalities, including Philadelphia’s very own Meek Mill.

The rapper said ‘Philadelphia is the closet’ [sic] thing to gta you can get in real life!”, referring to the grand theft auto video game series.

Philadelphia rapper Meek Mill compared the scene to the video game series Grand Theft Auto

Philadelphia rapper Meek Mill compared the scene to the video game series Grand Theft Auto

Others, however, were in disbelief at how much the man was risking his own health.

Comedian, writer and actor Travon Free pointed out that ‘there are no ICU beds for reckless behavior gone wrong’.

Author Mikki Kendall marveled at ‘The sheer number of diseases and carcinogens in this water…’

Comedian, writer and actor Travon Free pointed out that 'there are no ICU beds for reckless behavior gone wrong'.

Comedian, writer and actor Travon Free pointed out that ‘there are no ICU beds for reckless behavior gone wrong’.

Author Mikki Kendall marveled at 'The sheer number of diseases and carcinogens in this water...'

Author Mikki Kendall marveled at ‘The sheer number of diseases and carcinogens in this water…’

According to a study by the National Institute of Health, this man might have delved into several viruses.

The Schuylkill River rose to a major flood early Thursday morning, according to ABC News

The National Weather Service has raised the predicted water level for the river to 17.2 feet — surpassing the highest recorded total of 17 feet

At least five people have been killed in the storm in the state of Pennsylvania.

“Floods can increase the transmission of viral diseases, especially waterborne infections such as diarrhea, hepatitis A and E, airborne infections and vector-borne illnesses such as yellow fever, West Nile fever (WWF) and dengue fever,” it said. the report. say.

if a website pointed out that he wasn’t the only one trying to float around town.

A journalist photographed a man trying to float past the floodwaters while shooting several beers into a flotation device.

National Institute of Health Says Floods Can Spread Several Viruses, Including Hepatitis A and C

National Institute of Health Says Floods Can Spread Several Viruses, Including Hepatitis A and C

Perhaps this man was inspired by a New Yorker who was caught smoking from a bong while floating on the waters of New York City.

He leaned on the raft as he floated in the murky water

The man laid his head back on the raft and appeared to be enjoying himself as Hurricane Ida ripped through the Big Apple

In a video posted to Twitter at 11:37 p.m. Wednesday, a man was spotted lying on a float in the pool smoking hookah as he floated down a New York alley like it was a lazy river

The entire northeast was hit by the hurricane’s deadly remnants, killing at least 48 people after the tail of the Ida crept through the tristate area all Wednesday night, bringing rain in less than a day for a month, flooding homes as people slept and shared of New Jersey torn by tornadoes.

At least 12 people were killed in New York City when water flooded into basement apartments, uprooted cars and smashed into buildings in Brooklyn and Queens.

QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY: Members of the FDNY are pictured in the midwater rescuing a woman from her car

QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY: Members of the FDNY are pictured in the midwater rescuing a woman from her car

Among them, a two-year-old in New York City who was found dead in an apartment in Woodside, Queens, along with a 48-year-old woman and a 50-year-old man.

They were all locked up in their basement apartment. Another woman who died was 86 and lived in a basement in Elmhurst, Queens.

More people have now been found dead in New York City from Ida than in Louisiana, which had days to prepare for the storm.

The first warnings came around 7 p.m. and by 10 p.m. the NYPD was recovering dead bodies from basement homes.

At least 25 people were killed in New Jersey – five were swept away in cars that became submerged and five died in an apartment complex in Elizabeth.

In nearby Passaic, a man in his 70s died in his car after it became submerged, and two other people in the same area ended up in a river.

QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY: A homeless man stands in the doorway of a deli during flash flooding caused by Storm Ida

QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY: A homeless man stands in the doorway of a deli during flash flooding caused by Storm Ida

At least five people have been killed in the storm in the state of Pennsylvania.

The Schuylkill River rose to a major flood stage early Thursday morning, according to ABC news.

The National Weather Service has raised the predicted water level for the river to 17.2 feet — more than the highest recorded total of 17 feet.

The overflow of the Schuykill River caused Philadelphia to experience record flooding

The overflow of the Schuykill River caused Philadelphia to experience record flooding

Daily rainfall in Central Park and Newark, New Jersey, broke records on Wednesday.

New York’s iconic park fell 7.13 inches, breaking the record of 3.84 inches in 1927.

Meanwhile, 8.41 inches fell in Newark, which hampered airport operations, breaking the 1959 record of 2.22 inches.

In Passaic, New Jersey, Mayor Hector Lora said the city saw up to 8 feet of water.

QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY: The inside of an MTA bus was flooded

The driver plowed through 3-4 feet of rain

QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY: The inside of an MTA bus was submerged when a driver plowed through 3-4 feet of rain

“In the area where we unfortunately experienced a loss of life – I must say that our prayers and support go out to this person’s family – there was more than two meters of water in that area.

‘Fire and police had to stop their efforts because our fire truck literally got stuck in the road. We had ambulances stuck on the road.

“There were areas in our city where we saw water up to two meters long,” he said.

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