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The ACT is set to bring in mandatory Covid vaccines for all frontline healthcare workers

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The ACT will introduce mandatory Covid vaccines for all frontline health workers – as Canberra registers 33 new cases

  • The ACT will require its frontline health workers to be fully vaccinated
  • The mandate applies to all employees in hospitals, hospices, ambulance services
  • 33 new cases reported on Tuesday, 28 linked, five still under investigation










The Australian Capital Territory will require its frontline health workers to be fully vaccinated as the area has registered 33 new cases of COVID.

The mandate applies to all employees in hospitals, hospices and ambulance services.

While consultations are underway on the exact requirements of the mandate, health professionals are expected to have their first dose of any vaccine by October 29 and be fully vaccinated by December 1.

Of the 33 new cases reported Tuesday, 28 have been linked, while five are still under investigation.

There were at least 14 cases that were contagious while in the community and six were quarantined for their entire contagious period.

The Australian Capital Territory will require its frontline health workers to be fully vaccinated as the area has registered 33 new cases of COVID

The number of COVID patients in Canberra’s hospitals now stands at 14, with five in intensive care and three on ventilators.

ACT Health Minister Rachel Stephen-Smith said the number of vaccines in health care was already high in the wake of the mandate.

More than 80 percent of ACT health personnel have self-reported being vaccinated with at least one dose.

“Most other jurisdictions have gone this route,” said Ms. Stephen-Smith.

‘The impact on the workforce will be small, if any.’

The new numbers come as ACT health authorities outlined plans for public reporting once lockdowns were eased.

The ACT’s health officer Dr Kerryn Coleman said plans were being made for the area to report only significant cases to the community.

“We will focus our reporting on only those who pose a risk to others in the community, not those who pose a low risk,” said Dr. Coleman.

‘We do expect larger daily case numbers. This is inevitable for a number of things, but mostly because of the highly contagious nature of Delta and more people in the community as we ease restrictions.”

The chief health officer also expressed concern about a large number of Canberrans waiting almost two weeks after the onset of COVID-like symptoms to come in for testing.

“These statistics are going in the wrong direction,” said Dr Coleman.

“We need to stay on track and be vigilant and continue to follow public health guidelines until the current lockdown restrictions are lifted.”

Canberra’s lockdown will end on October 15, with further easing of restrictions on October 29.

It comes as some COVID restrictions were eased on Tuesday, with some 12th and 11th grade students allowed to return to the classroom.

12th grade students can return to the schools for practicals and assessments, while some 11th grade students can only attend in person for essential assessments that cannot wait until October 18, when all senior classes resume on campus.

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