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Stefanos Tsitsipas’ comfort breaks aren’t the only thing to be washed away in the sport

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Stefanos Tsitsipas’ comfort breaks aren’t the only thing that needs to be washed away… it’s time we got rid of the double law of football, the feeding problem of rugby and the snail’s pace cricket

  • The problems go way beyond the time it takes Stefanos Tsitsipas to find the flush
  • Punishing handball on the line with both a red card and a penalty is nonsense
  • Scrums should be a physical battle, but are often hijacked by scrum halves











It takes lawmakers half as long to read this article as it takes Stefanos Tsitsipas to spend a penny. Interesting.

Sorry for stealing your sentence, Andy. But take it as a compliment. Yes, this week’s barney on New York’s swamps sparked important discussions about tennis players and their comfort breaks.

But the problems extend far beyond the time it takes Tsitsipas to find the flush at Flushing Meadows.

Andy Murray was angry about Stefanos Tsitsipas’ long toilet breaks at the US Open

Sports in general remains full of rules that belong in the trash. Anachronisms without meaning, and game art that stains the spectacle.

So while we’re in the mood for change, let’s get rid of this one too…

THE LAW OF FOOTBALL OF DOUBLE DANGER

Sending Reece James away at Anfield was further proof that punishing handball on the line with both a red card and a penalty is nonsense.

Sentences must fit the crime. James denied no scoring chance. He denied a goal.

And so football needs a penalty for such scenarios. In this way, justice is served and an often harmless offense does not distort the course of an entire match.

Liverpool were awarded a penalty and Chelsea were reduced to 10 by Reece James' handball

Liverpool were awarded a penalty and Chelsea were reduced to 10 by Reece James’ handball

RUGBY’S NUTRITION PROBLEM

Scrums should be a struggle for physical supremacy, but all too often they are hijacked by mischievous scrum halves.

After a brief appearance, the umpires let the problem fester again.

Nowhere was this more apparent – or more frustrating – than during the Lions’ decider against South Africa.

SNAIL’S PACE CRICKET

It is fortunate that no one in cricket is concerned about the game dragging on. Imagine if they were worried that younger fans and their shorter attention spans wouldn’t last up to a five-day delay.

Maybe they should even come up with a new format – ha, think about that! Either way, why umpires aren’t doing more to keep over-rates from being hampered by tinkering and drink breaks is a mystery.

Even the last few overs of T20 have gotten tortuous. Every ball requires a cabinet meeting. Keep it up and they’ll have to shorten the game even more… oh wait.

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