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Record high: U.S college students turned to Marijuana in record breaking numbers during the pandemic

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Record high! More university students than ever are weeding during the pandemic, up 44% in 2020 – but the number drinking regularly has fallen by 10%

  • According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s annual “Monitoring the Future” study, 44 percent of college students reported using marijuana in 2020
  • Marijuana use among college students rose 14 percent from 2006, when only 30 percent of college students reported marijuana use
  • College-age students also saw an increase from 32 percent in 2007 to 42 percent in 2020, a similar increase to their peers, the study reported.
  • The increase in marijuana use has been attributed in part to the ongoing pandemic and legislation that has made recreational use legal in many states
  • Researchers based data from online responses from 1,550 middle-aged adults surveyed between March 30, 2020 and November 30, 2020
  • In 2020, college students, a group who reported binge drinking more often, reported ‘significantly lower’ alcohol use compared to the previous year










More students than ever are using marijuana, and nearly half were on the drug in 2020 when COVID hit the US.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s annual Monitoring the Future study, 44 percent of college students reported using marijuana in 2020, a six percent increase from 2015 and a 14 percent increase from 2006 — when only 30 percent of college students admitted to using weed.

And it’s not just college students consuming marijuana in record numbers, middle-aged students also saw an increase from 32 percent in 2007 to 42 percent in 2020, a similar increase to their continuing education peers, the study reported.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s annual “Monitoring the Future” study, 44 percent of college students reported using marijuana in 2020

Researchers based the data on online responses from 1,550 college-age adults from March 30, 2020 through November 30, 2020

Researchers based the data on online responses from 1,550 college-age adults from March 30, 2020 to November 30, 2020

The increase in marijuana use has been attributed in part to the ongoing pandemic, with many likely using the drug to allay fears of COVID.

It’s also likely due to legislation that has legalized recreational marijuana in an increasing number of US states, meaning students 21 or older can start purchasing the drug as they would drink alcohol in states where it’s legal.

Researchers based the data on online responses from 1,550 middle-aged adults.

They began collecting data for the study on March 30, 2020, including university campus closures due to COVID, and continued through November 30, 2020, when cases continued to increase.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed the way young people interact and provides an opportunity to explore whether these changes have changed drug use,” NIDA Director Nora D. Volkow said in a statement. Edition.

“For the future, it will be critical to explore how and when different substances are used among this young population and what the impact of these shifts is over time,” she added.

The rise in marijuana use has been partially attributed to the ongoing pandemic

The rise in marijuana use has been partially attributed to the ongoing pandemic

As more students light up, the less alcohol they drink.

According to the study in 2020 college students, a group that reported binge drinking more often reported “significantly lower” alcohol consumption compared to the previous year.

Students who reported alcohol use in the past 30 days fell from 62 percent in 2019 to 56 percent in 2020, the study said, while 28 percent reported being drunk in the past 30 days, compared with 35 percent in 2019.

“While binge drinking has gradually declined among college students in recent decades, this is a new all-time low, possibly reflecting the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of shorter time spent with college friends,” John Schulenberg, the lead researcher of the study said.

The study also noted a small decline in nicotine and marijuana vaping, which increased among college students from 2017 to 2019, and cigarette smoking, which hit an all-time low of 4.1 percent, down 3.8 percent from of 2019.

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