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Moment a Japanese tanker docks into a harbour with a 32-foot dead whale stuck on its bow 

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How did they not notice? The moment a Japanese tanker docks in a harbor with a 32-foot dead whale stuck on its bow

  • Shocking images show the huge creature that lay sprawled across the ship on Tuesday
  • Tanker crew claims they did not notice that they hit the whale during the voyage
  • Witnesses at Mizushima Port in Kurashiki said they had never seen anything like it
  • Coast Guard said measures to prevent such incident were under review
  • Species of whale has not been confirmed, but it is believed to be a fin whale
  • It is unclear whether the company that owns the tanker will be investigated










A 32-foot whale carcass has been found clamped to the bow of a Japanese tanker as it pulled into port.

Shocking images show the huge creature sprawled across the ship on Tuesday in the port of Mizushima in the city of Kurashiki.

The Coast Guard was called to the harbor after locals spotted the dead whale.

Local news site Yomiuri reported that the tanker had passed through the Pacific Ocean on its way to Mizushima harbor and the crew claimed they had no idea they had hit a whale.

“I’ve been fishing here for decades, but it’s the first time I’ve seen a whale,” a fisherman who witnessed the tanker pull into port told local media.

‘I’ve been living for over eighty years, but it’s my first time’ [seeing a whale]said another witness.

Shocking footage shows the huge whale sprawled across the ship on Tuesday in Mizushima harbor in the city of Kurashiki

Coastguards were called to harbor after locals spotted the dead whale

Coastguards were called to harbor after locals spotted the dead whale

Local news site Yomiuri reported that the tanker had passed through the Pacific Ocean on its way to Mizushima harbor and the crew claimed they had no idea they had hit a whale.

Local news site Yomiuri reported that the tanker had passed through the Pacific Ocean on its way to Mizushima harbor and the crew claimed they had no idea they had hit a whale.

A Mizushima Coast Guard spokesman said they had never experienced anything like this and measures were being taken to prevent such an incident from happening again.

The whale’s species has yet to be confirmed, but the Institute of Cetacean Research told Yomiuri it appeared to be a fin whale.

The fin whale, also known as the fin whale, is listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

It is the second longest cetacean species on Earth after the blue whale, measuring 27.3 meters (89.6 feet) in length and weighing 74 tons.

It is found in all major oceans of the world and in waters ranging from the polar to the tropical.

No information has been released on whether the company that owns the tanker or its crew will be investigated.  The company has not been named

No information has been released on whether the company that owns the tanker or its crew will be investigated. The company has not been named

The whale's species has yet to be confirmed, but the Institute of Cetacean Research told Yomiuri it appeared to be a fin whale.

The whale’s species has yet to be confirmed, but the Institute of Cetacean Research told Yomiuri it appeared to be a fin whale.

Like all whales, the finback was heavily hunted during the 20th century, with an estimated 725,000 being killed in the Southern Hemisphere between 1905 and 1976.

Today, approximately 100,000 to 119,000 fin whales remain in the wild.

Another Japanese news site suggested the whale could be a humpback whale, due to its ‘chin pattern’

No information has been released on whether the company that owns the tanker or its crew will be investigated. The company has not been named.

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