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Migrants are seen being detained by Border Patrol at remote Arizona crossing known as ‘The Gap

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Huddled in the sand and surrounded by the discarded shoes, scrunchies and phones of those who came before them, this is the moment a group of Haitians was apprehended by Border Patrol at a remote spot known to migrants as ‘The Gap.’

The little-known crossing point near the Arizona city of Yuma is the site of a brewing border crisis that could come to rival the better-known Texas hotspots such as the Rio Grande Valley, and more recently, Del Rio.

The figures alone are stark: the Yuma sector has seen a 2,399.6% spike in arrivals compared to this time last year, with up to 900 people crossing each day.

In August, the most recent month for which figures are available, 17,000 crossed into Yuma compared to just 694 for the same time in 2020.

As a result, Border Patrol facilities are overwhelmed: even the tented overflow camp built in April and designed to hold 500 people is stuffed with 1,300 inmates.

DailyMail.com witnessed groups of migrants from Haiti, Colombia and Honduras crossing and being detained by Border Patrol agents 

The vast majority arrive via the Gap – a break in the border fence close to the Morelos Dam which allows an easy crossing of the Colorado River from the town of Los Algodones on the Mexican side

The vast majority arrive via the Gap – a break in the border fence close to the Morelos Dam which allows an easy crossing of the Colorado River from the town of Los Algodones on the Mexican side

The little-known crossing point near the Arizona city of Yuma is known as 'The Gap' and is the site of a brewing border crisis that could come to rival better-known Texas hotspots such as the Rio Grande Valley

The little-known crossing point near the Arizona city of Yuma is known as ‘The Gap’ and is the site of a brewing border crisis that could come to rival better-known Texas hotspots such as the Rio Grande Valley

The Yuma sector in Arizona has seen a 2,399.6% spike in arrivals compared to this time last year, with up to 900 people crossing each day

The Yuma sector in Arizona has seen a 2,399.6% spike in arrivals compared to this time last year, with up to 900 people crossing each day

Border Patrol agents are stretched thin over the crisis which has seen a growing number of Haitian, Colombian and Honduran migrants cross into the US

 Border Patrol agents are stretched thin over the crisis which has seen a growing number of Haitian, Colombian and Honduran migrants cross into the US

In August, the most recent month for which figures are available, 17,000 crossed into Yuma compared to just 694 for the same time in 2020

In August, the most recent month for which figures are available, 17,000 crossed into Yuma compared to just 694 for the same time in 2020

Border Patrol agents told DailyMail.com the crossings are 'relentless' and are happening 24 hours a day, seven days a week

Border Patrol agents told DailyMail.com the crossings are ‘relentless’ and are happening 24 hours a day, seven days a week

The vast majority arrive via The Gap – a break in the border fence close to the Morelos Dam which allows an easy crossing of the Colorado River from the town of Los Algodones on the Mexican side.

Vincent Dulesky of Border Patrol Yuma Station said many of the arrivals come from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador but added they are seeing increasing numbers of Haitians – who made up the majority of new arrivals when DailyMail.com visited.

Known to Haitians as ‘le Trou’, the migrants told DailyMail.com that word has spread that The Gap is an easy place to cross.

‘We had heard of The Gap and people said this is the place to come,’ Wendell Fify, 17, said before he was bundled into a Border Patrol van.

He added: ‘It’s a gap in the fence so we came here. I came to the US because my family are here – my mom and dad. I was in Brazil before. I want to have a life here and work.’

He was accompanied by another Haitian family: Jamal, 37, his wife Bianca, 27, and their daughter Jacquentia, three.

Jamal told DailyMail.com that the family had been living in Chile but decided to travel to The Gap after hearing the border was open.

He said: ‘We were in Chile but we heard the border was open so we went to Mexicali and then came here [Yuma].

‘We are desperate for a good life for our daughter. We spent all our money to come. It’s bad in Haiti – it’s dangerous and violent with gangs. We can’t live there.’

With them was Colombian Juan Sebastian who was traveling with daughters Martina, 12, and Alyssa, two.

He told DailyMail.com that he had sold all of his possessions to pay for a flight to Tijuana, an onward bus ride to Los Algodones and the $2,000-per-person fee to cross charged by the local cartel smugglers.

Juan Sebastian said: ‘I’m here in search of a safe place and a better future for my daughters. It was a difficult thing to do because we had to sell what little we had to get here.’

Known to Haitians as 'le Trou', the migrants told DailyMail.com that word has spread that The Gap is an easy place to cross

Known to Haitians as ‘le Trou’, the migrants told DailyMail.com that word has spread that The Gap is an easy place to cross

Haitian family Jamal, 37, his wife Bianca, 27, and their daughter Jacquentia, three were seen at the border. Jamal told DailyMail.com that the family had been living in Chile but decided to travel to the Gap after hearing the border was open

Haitian family Jamal, 37, his wife Bianca, 27, and their daughter Jacquentia, three were seen at the border. Jamal told DailyMail.com that the family had been living in Chile but decided to travel to the Gap after hearing the border was open

Haitian family Jamal, 37, his wife Bianca, 27, and their daughter Jacquentia, three, were seen at the border. Jamal (pictured with his daughter) told DailyMail.com that the family had been living in Chile but decided to travel to The Gap after hearing the border was open 

Colombian Juan Sebastian (pictured) was traveling with daughters Martina, 12, and Alyssa, two. He told DailyMail.com that he had sold all of his possessions to pay for a flight to Tijuana, an onward bus ride to Los Algodones and the $2,000-per-person fee to cross charged by the local cartel smugglers

Colombian Juan Sebastian (pictured) was traveling with daughters Martina, 12, and Alyssa, two. He told DailyMail.com that he had sold all of his possessions to pay for a flight to Tijuana, an onward bus ride to Los Algodones and the $2,000-per-person fee to cross charged by the local cartel smugglers

Yuma is less dangerous than the neighboring El Centro sector which is completely fenced off and is only accessible for those with the means to pay up to $10,000 to people smugglers who bring them across

 Yuma is less dangerous than the neighboring El Centro sector which is completely fenced off and is only accessible for those with the means to pay up to $10,000 to people smugglers who bring them across

DailyMail.com witnessed migrant climb down a slope leading to the Morelos Dam – a joint US-Mexican installation in the Rio Colorado River

DailyMail.com witnessed migrant climb down a slope leading to the Morelos Dam – a joint US-Mexican installation in the Rio Colorado River

DailyMail.com saw the migrants scramble past a sluice gate running alongside the dam, crossing into the US halfway before continuing up to the Gap and out into the fields

DailyMail.com saw the migrants scramble past a sluice gate running alongside the dam, crossing into the US halfway before continuing up to the Gap and out into the fields

A father hugs his daughter after crossing over into the U.S. via 'The Gap' at the Arizona border

A father hugs his daughter after crossing over into the U.S. via ‘The Gap’ at the Arizona border 

For Border Patrol's Yuma Station, which alone covers 61 miles of border, the task of dealing with thousands of migrants is exhausting, officers tell DailyMail.com

For Border Patrol’s Yuma Station, which alone covers 61 miles of border, the task of dealing with thousands of migrants is exhausting, officers tell DailyMail.com

Most of the migrants immediately surrendered to Border Patrol but others, mainly single men and women who face being thrown out instantly under Title 42, attempted to slip away through the fields

Most of the migrants immediately surrendered to Border Patrol but others, mainly single men and women who face being thrown out instantly under Title 42, attempted to slip away through the fields

Although some migrants cross further east in the Cabreza Pieta National Wildlife Refuge, the vast majority arrive via The Gap – with DailyMail.com witnessing a stream of people coming through at the rate of 10 to 20 every half hour

Although some migrants cross further east in the Cabreza Pieta National Wildlife Refuge, the vast majority arrive via The Gap – with DailyMail.com witnessing a stream of people coming through at the rate of 10 to 20 every half hour 

Some groups were ushered across the border by cartel coyotes who would bring them halfway before heading back to Mexico – a process captured on camera by DailyMail.com

Some groups were ushered across the border by cartel coyotes who would bring them halfway before heading back to Mexico – a process captured on camera by DailyMail.com

Border Patrol agents told DailyMail.com the crossings are ‘relentless’ and are happening 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Although some migrants cross further east in the Cabreza Pieta National Wildlife Refuge, the vast majority arrive via the Gap – with DailyMail.com witnessing a stream of people coming through at the rate of 10 to 20 every half hour.

The routine never varied. First, migrants would climb down a slope leading to the Morelos Dam – a joint US-Mexican installation in the Rio Colorado River.

Then, they would scramble past a sluice gate running alongside the dam, crossing into the US halfway before continuing up to the Gap and out into the fields.

Some came alone. Other groups were ushered across the border by cartel coyotes who would bring them halfway before heading back to Mexico – a process captured on camera by DailyMail.com.

Most immediately surrendered to Border Patrol but others, mainly single men and women who face being thrown out instantly under Title 42, attempted to slip away through the fields.

Others pretend to be younger than they are. Jackson Garcia, of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, told DailyMail.com he was 17.

He said: ‘It was too hard to live there [in San Pedro Sula]. I had to get out so I came here by myself.’

A few minutes later, he told a skeptical Border Patrol agent he was 16. The agent said: ‘A lot of them pretend to be younger than they are so they’re exempt from Title 42.

‘He couldn’t remember his date of birth when I asked him so we’ll have a look at birth certificates and see if we can match him up. It’s relatively simple to see if they’re making it up.’

According to Todd Bensman of the Center for Immigration Studies, many of the migrants who head to Yuma plan to end up in California.

He told DailyMail.com: ‘Yuma is where the people who want to go to California go – it’s closer than the crossing points in Texas.’

One migrant told DailyMail.com before being bundled into a Border Patrol van, 'We had heard of the Gap and people said this is the place to come'

One migrant told DailyMail.com before being bundled into a Border Patrol van, ‘We had heard of the Gap and people said this is the place to come’

Vincent Dulesky of Border Patrol Yuma Station said many of the arrivals come from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador but added they are seeing increasing numbers of Haitians – who made up the majority of new arrivals when DailyMail.com visited

Vincent Dulesky of Border Patrol Yuma Station said many of the arrivals come from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador but added they are seeing increasing numbers of Haitians – who made up the majority of new arrivals when DailyMail.com visited

Individual agents told DailyMail.com that because Title 42 doesn't permanently bar would-be immigrants permanently, they have found themselves arresting the same people repeatedly

Individual agents told DailyMail.com that because Title 42 doesn’t permanently bar would-be immigrants permanently, they have found themselves arresting the same people repeatedly

Border Patrol agents tell DailyMail.com that their station is so over stretched it has had to draft in officers from the Yuma Police Department under a Biden administration program called Operation Stone Garden that pays police to help Border Patrol when needed

Border Patrol agents tell DailyMail.com that their station is so over stretched it has had to draft in officers from the Yuma Police Department under a Biden administration program called Operation Stone Garden that pays police to help Border Patrol when needed

Border Patrol facilities are now overwhelmed and even the tented overflow camp built in April and designed to hold 500 people is stuffed with 1,300

Border Patrol facilities are now overwhelmed and even the tented overflow camp built in April and designed to hold 500 people is stuffed with 1,300

Yuma is also less dangerous than the neighboring El Centro sector which is completely fenced off and is only accessible for those with the means to pay up to $10,000 to people smugglers who bring them across.

For Border Patrol’s Yuma Station, which alone covers 61 miles of border, the task of dealing with thousands of migrants is exhausting.

The station is so over stretched it has had to draft in officers from the Yuma Police Department under a Biden administration program called Operation Stone Garden that pays police to help Border Patrol when needed.

Individual agents told DailyMail.com that because Title 42 doesn’t permanently bar would-be immigrants permanently, they have found themselves arresting the same people repeatedly.

Although a nightmare for law enforcement, for the Haitians and others who make it to the Gap, this is their first step towards the American dream.

After asking DailyMail.com when Border Patrol would arrive, one Haitian mom said: ‘I am so exhausted – it took a long time and we have come very far. We came through the Darien Gap.

‘But now things will be better. We are in America.’

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