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Kansas grandmother becomes first COVID-19 recorded death in the US

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The identity of a Kansas grandmother who is now the first recorded COVID-19 death in the United States has been revealed after her cause of death was changed to the virus in May.

For more than a year, Patricia Dowd, a California woman who died of the virus on February 6, 2020, was believed to be the country’s first COVID-19 death.

But an investigation by the Bay Area News Group revealed that five January 2020 deaths were recently listed as COVID-19-related — the earliest was Lovell Brown, of Leavenworth, Kansas, who died on January 9, 2020 at age 78. according to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

Her identity was not made public due to patient privacy laws, and Brown’s relatives were not notified of the change on her death certificate.

Bruin’s daughter, Peaches Foster, requested a copy of her mother’s amended death certificate after being contacted by: The Mercury News through the funeral home that provided Brown’s funeral services.

A doctor in intensive care changed Brown’s cause of death just three months ago, on May 12, from “acute stroke and chronic intrusive lung disease” to “COVID-19 pneumonia,” The Mercury News reported.

It is unknown why they did that a year after Brown’s death.

The identity of the first COVID-19 death turned out to be Lovell Brown, from Kansas. She died at Providence Hospital after experiencing COVID-19 related symptoms on Christmas 2019

Brown died at the age of 78 on January 9, 2020, but her cause of death was initially listed as 'acute stroke chronic intrusive lung disease'.  It is not known why it was changed to 'COVID-19 pneumonia' three months ago, a year after Brown's death

Brown died at the age of 78 on January 9, 2020, but her cause of death was initially listed as ‘acute stroke chronic intrusive lung disease’. It is not known why it was changed to ‘COVID-19 pneumonia’ three months ago, a year after Brown’s death

Foster tried to contact the doctor but was told he was in the process of treating COVID-19 patients.

She reportedly told her brother that she believed their mother could have died from COVID-19 in March 2020, as the country was shut down and the number of cases increased in the states.

Before her death, Brown was experiencing COVID-like symptoms, including headache, cough, fever and body aches.

The symptoms had started in Christmas 2019, when she complained to relatives that they could not taste the food they had brought her at the nursing home where she lived.

Brown had pre-existing conditions that could have potentially increased the severity of her symptoms.

She suffered from diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and had suffered from lung cancer for years.

The Center for Disease Control has recorded 5,450 COVID-19 deaths in the state of Kansas since the start of the pandemic

The Center for Disease Control has recorded 5,450 COVID-19 deaths in the state of Kansas since the start of the pandemic

The US has recorded more than 640,000 deaths since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic

The US has recorded more than 640,000 deaths since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic

The CDC has reported that there are currently more than 39 million cases of COVID-19 in the U.S.

The CDC has reported that there are currently more than 39 million cases of COVID-19 in the U.S.

Covid-19 cases and deaths rose over the summer as the highly contagious Delta variant became the most common in the US

Covid-19 cases and deaths rose over the summer as the highly contagious Delta variant became the most common in the US

She was initially taken to Saint John Hospital after experiencing breathing problems, then was transferred to the intensive care unit of Providence Medical Center in Kansas City, where she died.

Ten months after Brown’s death, her sister and brother-in-law also died from COVID.

While the disease is believed to have been in the US as early as December 2019, without a tissue or blood sample from Brown, who was cremated, it’s impossible to confirm the cause of death.

Sam Allred, a spokesperson for Providence Hospital, told The Mercury News they would help Foster navigate the change on her mother’s death certificate, and the reason it would happen a year later.

“We’ll work with her to try and get all the answers,” he said.

The five modified COVID-19 deaths in January 2020 in California, Oklahoma, Alabama, Georgia, Wisconsin and Kansas have changed the national perception of the events that unfolded in the early stages of the pandemic, when the virus was new and many patients had a virus. misdiagnosed, or stayed at home and attributed the symptoms to a cold.

California has recorded 5,450 COVID-19 deaths since the start of the pandemic, according to the Center for Disease Control.

There are currently 373,171 cases of COVID-19 and 12,810 hospitalizations in the state, according to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

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