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Gunmaker subpoenas report cards of five kids shot dead in Sandy Hook massacre

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Remington has sued for the academic, attendance and disciplinary records of five children shot to death in the 2012 Sandy Hook massacre after their families filed a lawsuit against the bankrupt gunsmith.

The subpoena was revealed in a court filing filed by lawyers for the families of the five children who requested changes to a protection order to prevent the release of the data.

Remington has also sued for the employment records of four schoolteachers killed in the horrific massacre, which are included in the lawsuit.

The nine families who lost relatives when 20-year-old Adam Lanza shot 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newton, Connecticut, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Remington on December 15, 2014.

The case, which alleges Remington recklessly marketed its Bushmaster Model XM15-E2S .223-caliber semi-automatic rifle, is set to go to trial this month.

Connecticut State Police Detective Barbara J. Mattson holds a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model used by Adam Lanza in the 2012 Sandy Hook School shooting

Veronique Pozner reacts with grief after learning that a gunman killed her son Noah at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, on December 14, 2012

Veronique Pozner reacts with grief after learning that a gunman killed her son Noah at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, on December 14, 2012

Jackie Barden reacts with grief after learning that a gunman killed her son Daniel at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown

Jackie Barden reacts with grief after learning that a gunman killed her son Daniel at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown

Law enforcement officers search outside of Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut in 2012

Law enforcement officers search outside of Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut in 2012

The court filing, obtained by DailyMail.com, reads that “there is no way” that the data requested by the gunmaker “will aid Remington in his defence.”

Remington had requested records including the application and admission papers, attendance records, transcripts, report cards and disciplinary records, among other records for the students.

“The plaintiffs do not understand why Remington would infringe the privacy of the families with such a request. Nevertheless, this personal and private information was provided to Remington,” the file reads.

“The plaintiffs therefore ask the Court to expand the categories of protected information to include private education, employment and medical records and information.”

The filing notes that only one category in the current protective order protects information disclosed by parents.

Meanwhile, the current protection order lists eight categories of information to be protected. Seven of those eight categories are designed to protect Remington’s proprietary business information from disclosure.”

The families also want to remove protection from Remington’s proprietary information, which is “now obsolete” because, as a gunmaker’s attorney admitted, the company “no longer exists.”

Josh Koskoff, the families’ lead attorney, told the… Connecticut Post Thursday that he has “no explanation” as to why Remington wants the academic and disciplinary files.

“The only relevant part of their attendance list is that they were sitting at their desks on December 14, 2012,,” Koskoff said.

The subpoena was revealed in a court filing filed by lawyers for the families of the five children who requested changes to a protection order to prevent the release of the data.

The subpoena was revealed in a court filing filed by lawyers for the families of the five children who requested changes to a protection order to prevent the release of the data.

Lawyers for the families filed another document Thursday noting that Remington was

Lawyers for the families filed another document Thursday noting that Remington was “executing a plan to dominate the firearms industry”

Thursday’s court records say Remington’s subpoenas were sent to the Newtown Public School District in mid-July — just weeks before each of the nine families was offered a $3.6 million settlement.

Also in July, lawyers for the Remington families accused the Remington families of sending them 18,465 “random cartoon images,” such as emojis with icons of ice cream bowls, Santa Claus and weightlifters.

“Each of these images was produced six times, three times as a PNG file and three times as an SVG file,” reads a July 2 submission.

Remington is also said to have handed over 15,825 “random photos,” including people riding go-karts and dirt bikes, as well as 1,657 videos featuring gender reveals and videos featuring ice bucket challenges.

Lawyers for the families claimed in court documents in July that lawyers for Remington had sent them random images, including photos of ice cream bowls and Santa Claus.

Lawyers for the families claimed in court documents in July that lawyers for Remington had sent them random images, including photos of ice cream bowls and Santa Claus.

One of the random images Remington sent to lawyers for the families is pictured

One of the random images Remington sent to lawyers for the families is pictured

Another such image featured an image of a minion from the children's movie Despicable Me, cut into fillets with the caption,

Another such image featured an image of a minion from the children’s movie Despicable Me, cut into fillets with the caption, “filet minion.”

Other images reportedly sent by Remington include a couple holding hands, left, and a farmer with a pitchfork

Another such image featured an image of a minion from the children’s movie Despicable Me, cut into fillets with the caption, “filet minion.”

Through years of legal proceedings, Remington has claimed that it legalized and sold its guns and therefore should not be held liable for the deaths of the children and teachers.

The gunmaker’s defense, which was dissolved in bankruptcy court and sold its assets to several companies, is currently being heard by four insurance companies.

Koskoff said in a statement last month that Ironshore and James River, the two insurance companies that had offered settlements, “deserve credit for realizing now that promoting the use of AR-15s as weapons of war for civilians is indefensible.”

‘Insuring this kind of behavior is an unprofitable and unsustainable business model.’

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