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Fake heiress Anna Sorokin says she is ‘not dumb or greedy’ in first post-prison TV interview

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Anna Sorokin – the fake heiress who scammed banks, hotels and members of New York high society out of $275,000 – has given her first TV interview since her release from prison.

The 30-year-old German citizen, who is currently in ICE custody awaiting possible deportation to Europe, was released in February after nearly four years behind bars after being convicted of grand theft and theft of services.

Now Sorokin is teaming up with ABC’s Deborah Roberts for a 20/20 special, which airs in full Friday.

In a sneak preview of the interview, the convicted con man tries to soften herself by saying that she never pretended to be money and never intended to cheat.

“I’ve never had any fraudulent intentions – and I think that really counts,” she claims.

Sorokin, who wore heavy makeup and curled her hair for the interview, went on to say, “I’d like to show the world that I’m not this stupid, greedy person they portrayed to me.”

In 2013, Sorokin arrived in New York City posing as a wealthy German heiress named Anna Delvey. She spent the next four years living a life of luxury, often on the borrowed dimes of new friends who believed she had made an incredible amount of money.

Anna Sorokin – the fake heiress who scammed banks, hotels and members of New York high society out of $275,000 – gave her first TV interview since her release from prison

The 30-year-old German citizen was released in February after nearly four years behind bars after being convicted of grand theft and theft of services.  She is pictured in court in 2019

The 30-year-old German citizen was released in February after nearly four years behind bars after being convicted of grand theft and theft of services. She is pictured in court in 2019

Sorokin’s lawyer also appears in the 20/20 special, trying to explain his client’s actions.

“Anna was determined to do things the right way, but she couldn’t open those doors without doing something gray to open the door,” explained her attorney, Todd Spodek.

“Everyone creates the version of themselves they want the world to see… Everyone lies when it suits them… and Anna did the same. She couldn’t be 100% honest because no one wanted to listen to her.’

However, the 20/20 special also features an interview with one of Sorokin’s former friends, who had $62,000 in debt due to the fake heiress’ antics.

The ex-boyfriend, Rachel DeLoache Williams, tells 20/20 that she went on a trip to Morocco with Sorokin in 2017.

Williams believed Sorokin was paying the bill for the luxury vacation, but her credit cards mysteriously stopped working.

[The hotel] said to me, ‘Do you have a credit card?’ So I look at Anna and she says, ‘Can we just use yours now?’ Williams tells in the new TV special.

Williams later learned that the total amount billed to her credit card was over $62,000.

“She owed me more money than I made in a year,” Williams said.

The former girlfriend says she then fell behind on her rent and credit card payments, and was left “paniced”. She testified at Sorokin’s trial.

“It was very painful to have someone I put so much good will into but turned out to be a liar and willfully hurt me,” she said.

Sorokin, who wore heavy makeup and curled her hair for the interview, went on to say: 'I'd like to show the world that I'm not this stupid, greedy person they portrayed me to be'

Sorokin, who wore heavy makeup and curled her hair for the interview, went on to say: ‘I’d like to show the world that I’m not this stupid, greedy person they portrayed me to be’

The 20/20 special also features an interview with one of Sorokin's former friends, Rachel DeLoache Williams, who had $62,000 in debt due to the fake heiress' antics.

The 20/20 special also features an interview with one of Sorokin’s former friends, Rachel DeLoache Williams, who had $62,000 in debt due to the fake heiress’ antics.

Sorokin’s interview with ABC appears to be an attempt to brand himself more innocent and remorseful.

Earlier this year, she made more unpleasant comments.

She told Tatler in May, “It was the prosecutors’ job to make me look bad, but in the end they were angry because I had become so famous for it.”

She told The Times in March that the prison was a “pointless” “waste of time”, called the prosecution against her an “insult to her intelligence” and boasted that guards treated her like a “celebrity”.

On Twitter, she joked that the only job she would consider is Goldman Sachs’ creative director and… said ‘going to court is the new sex tape’.

Sorokin is now the subject of an upcoming Netflix project. The streaming giant reportedly paid her $320,000 to consult on a series about her crimes, and she has used most of the money to pay off her victims.

Luxurious life!  Sorokin (far right) pictured at a glitzy fashion week party in NYC in 2014

Luxurious life! Sorokin (far right) pictured at a glitzy fashion week party in NYC in 2014

Sorokin's interview with ABC appears to be an attempt to brand himself more innocent and remorseful.  Earlier this year, she made more unpleasant comments.  Pictured, Sorokin during her Manhattan Supreme Court conviction in May 2019

Sorokin’s interview with ABC appears to be an attempt to brand himself more innocent and remorseful. Earlier this year, she made more unpleasant comments. Pictured, Sorokin during her Manhattan Supreme Court conviction in May 2019

HOW SOROKIN MAY MAKE MONEY FROM HER CRIMES AND WHO SHOULD REFUND

Under New York state law, a convict can profit from his crimes as long as the money earned is made accessible to his victims. It is what is known as the Son of Sam Law.

“The Son of Sam Act requires any entity that enters into a contract with anyone accused or convicted of a crime to provide a copy of the contract to the Crime Victims Compensation Board. That entity would have to deliver all money owed under the contract to the board for placing in an escrow account for five years.

If an interested party were to successfully prosecute the offender, the money from the contract would be used to pay any conviction. If no victims were incurred within the five-year period, the Crime Victim Compensation Commission would have to provide the money to the accused,” the state senate said in a statement.

It is unclear how many victims can claim from the perpetrator.

Sorokin was told to pay back $199,000 the banks she stole and pay $24,000 in state fines. A judge released her funds so she could pay them off before she got out of jail.

Rachael DeLoach Williams, the Vanity Fair photo editor who scammed them, was not refunded. She made $330,000 from TV and book deals on the ordeal.

Sorokin was also told she wouldn’t have to pay back the hotels she stole by staying in rooms and not paying the bill.

It means that after paying off the banks and state fines, she had about $100,000 to play with from the Netflix deal — though it’s unclear how much she was charged for the money.

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