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Dietitian Chloe McLeod reveals how you can make sure you’re eating 30 plants in a week through tips

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A dietitian has told you how to get 30 different servings of plants per week after it was revealed that this is the number you should aim for, rather than five servings of fruits and vegetables per day.

Chloe McLeod, from Sydney, explained that while 30 servings may sound like a “very large number,” it’s worth remembering that fruits and vegetables aren’t your only sources of “plants.”

You can also count things like whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, and even extra virgin olive oil.

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A dietitian has told how to get 30 different servings of plants in a week after it was revealed that this is the number to aim for (photo by Chloe McLeod)

But plant foods don't have to be fruits and vegetables;  it contains things like herbs, seeds, whole grains, legumes, and extra virgin olive oil (pictured)

But plant foods don't have to be fruits and vegetables;  it contains things like herbs, seeds, whole grains, legumes, and extra virgin olive oil (pictured)

But plant foods don’t have to be fruits and vegetables; it contains things like herbs, seeds, whole grains, legumes, and extra virgin olive oil (pictured)

“Aiming for 30 different plant-based foods over the course of the week is a lot easier when we look at all the different foods that can count towards this number,” Chloe wrote. Instagram.

The Eight Ways to Eat 30 Plants a Week Revealed

1. Add different spices to your dishes.

2. Sprinkle as many different seeds as possible on plates.

3. Add extra vegetables to fill up curries, stews and sauces.

4. Swap rice for a more unusual grain like amaranth, barley and buckwheat.

5. Add a can of legumes every time you cook vegetables.

6. Add a new plant to your cart every time you shop.

7. Choose multigrain bread, not white.

8. Keep track of what you eat.

“In addition to helping to develop a diverse gut microbiome, these plant foods are also good sources of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals that are beneficial to many aspects of our health.”

The first way Chloe said you can increase the plant-based content of your diet is by adding a “variety of spices” to your dishes.

She used the example of some hard-boiled eggs, tomato and avocado on toast, which you could sprinkle with parsley or dill.

The second way to boost your plant content is to sprinkle as many different seeds as possible on dishes.

Chloe likes to add sunflower seeds to her chia puddings, porridge and cereal.

“Add extra vegetables to fill up curries, stews, and sauces like bolognese,” Chloe said.

Zucchini, carrot and cauliflower do particularly well here.

Fourth, if you always eat rice, Chloe said it’s worth researching all the other different grains you could also eat, such as amaranth, barley, and buckwheat.

If you’re cooking meat, the dietitian said she always adds a can of legumes, you’ll get another serving.

“Aiming for 30 different plant foods over the course of the week is a lot easier when we consider all the different foods that can count towards this number,” Chloe said (two examples in the photo)

Finally, Chloe said you should try adding a new plant to your cart every time you go to the grocery store and always opt for multigrain bread instead of white.

“Keep track of how you’re going and every plant you eat with a list,” Chloe added.

This will keep you on track.

Previously, Chloe (pictured) showed exactly what a serving of vegetables really looks like, and the good news is that it's less than you think

Previously, Chloe (pictured) showed exactly what a serving of vegetables really looks like, and the good news is that it’s less than you think

The dietitian showed that a single serving of vegetables equals half a cup of cooked green or orange vegetables, whether that be broccoli, spinach, carrots or pumpkin (pictured)

The dietitian showed that a single serving of vegetables equals half a cup of cooked green or orange vegetables, whether that be broccoli, spinach, carrots or pumpkin (pictured)

The dietitian showed that a single serving of vegetables equals half a cup of cooked green or orange vegetables, whether that be broccoli, spinach, carrots or pumpkin (pictured)

Previously, Chloe showed exactly what a serving of veggies really looks like, and the good news is, it’s less than you think.

“Seeing this may make you realize that meeting your daily vegetarian goal is easier than you think,” Chloe explains.

‘A standard portion is about 75 grams, that’s what it looks like.’

The dietitian showed that a single serving of vegetables equals half a cup of cooked green or orange vegetables, whether that be broccoli, spinach, carrot or pumpkin.

This is worth about three roses.

You can also choose to eat half a cup of cooked, dried, or canned beans, peas, or lentils (preferably without added salt).

If you eat salad, it’s a whole cup of green leafy vegetables or raw salad greens.

“75 grams is equivalent to half a cup of sweet corn or half a medium potato or other starchy vegetables such as sweet potato, taro or cassava,” Chloe said.

Finally, a serving of vegetables is a medium-sized tomato or a cup of chopped vegetable sticks.

dr.  Megan Rossi (pictured), dietitian and King's College researcher, from Queensland, believes we should eat and drink at least 30 different plant-based foods each week.

dr. Megan Rossi (pictured), dietitian and King’s College researcher, from Queensland, believes we should eat and drink at least 30 different plant-based foods each week.

While it’s generally agreed that you need about five servings of fruits and vegetables a day to be healthy, not everyone agrees that this is perfect.

Leading Harley Street dietitian and King’s College research fellow, Dr. Megan Rossi, from Queensland, believes we should eat and drink at least 30 different plant-based foods each week.

That includes not just fruits and vegetables, but everything grown, such as seeds, herbs, and whole grains.

dr. Rossi also believes that our diets should be derived from the six different groups of plants: fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts, whole grains and legumes (such as lentils, chickpeas and beans).

“If you follow these two principles, the trillions of bacteria that line your gut can flourish, because each type of bacteria – and there are thousands of different strains – likes a different kind of plant food,” she previously told the Daily Mail Australia.

‘And because each bacterium does a different job – including producing vitamins, hormones or chemical messengers; training our immune system; help regulate our appetite or deactivate toxins – each has its own unique health benefits.”

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