Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Covid-19 Australia: NSW records 1,533 new cases

78

NSW has again broken a daily Covid-19 record with 1,533 new cases and four recorded deaths overnight.

The new deaths include a western Sydney man in his 60s, a southwestern woman in his 80s, a western man in his 50s and a southwestern man in his 70s. None of the residents have been vaccinated.

The cases announced Saturday came after it was revealed that a mother of four was one of 12 new deaths reported Friday.

Jamila Yaghi passed away Wednesday night, Granville MP Julia Finn said on Facebook. She was in her thirties and had not been vaccinated.

Jamila lived in Guildford until recently and was very involved in the community. She leaves behind four children and an extended family and many friends who loved her very much,” Finn wrote Friday.

A friend recalled Ms Yaghi as “one of a kind” on social media, describing her as someone “with the most amazing heart” and bringing laughter and joy into people’s lives.

More than 7,245,450 doses of vaccine have been administered in NSW, putting the state at 71.5 percent first dose coverage and 39.5 percent double dose

Ms Berejiklian warns the public to be prepared that hospitals will operate under crisis conditions in the coming months, but says the attack is planned and people will receive the care they need

Ms Berejiklian warns the public to be prepared that hospitals will operate under crisis conditions in the coming months, but says the attack is planned and people will receive the care they need

Jamila Yaghi passed away Wednesday night, Granville MP Julia Finn said on Facebook.  She was in her thirties and had not been vaccinated

Jamila Yaghi passed away Wednesday night, Granville MP Julia Finn said on Facebook. She was in her thirties and had not been vaccinated

Deputy NSW Chief Health Officer Marianne Gale told reporters on Friday that the woman was tested on Tuesday before dying the following day.

At least nine people have died at home in western Sydney or southwestern Sydney during the current outbreak, which began in mid-June.

Ms Yaghi’s was one of 12 deaths announced Friday by Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian, the highest daily death toll the state has seen during the pandemic.

The death toll for the current NSW outbreak is 119.

The state reported 1,431 new locally acquired cases on Friday, another daily record.

The number of cases is expected to worsen over the next two weeks, putting incredible strain on the health system in October before they start to decline.

That’s also the month when some restrictions are likely to be lifted as the state hits its 70 percent double-dose vaccine target.

More than 7,245,450 doses of vaccine have been administered in NSW, giving the state 71.5 percent first dose coverage and 39.5 percent double dose coverage.

Ms Berejiklian is warning the public to be prepared that hospitals will operate under crisis conditions in the coming months, but says the attack is planned and people will receive the care they need.

“Just because you hear that something else has been done (in hospitals), I don’t want people to worry about that because it’s in our pandemic plan,” she said.

Greater Sydney is now on lockdown for ten weeks and the rest of the state for almost three weeks

Greater Sydney is now on lockdown for ten weeks and the rest of the state for almost three weeks

Ms Berejiklian warns the public to be prepared that hospitals will operate under crisis conditions in the coming months, but says the attack is planned and people will receive the care they need

Ms Berejiklian warns the public to be prepared that hospitals will operate under crisis conditions in the coming months, but says the attack is planned and people will receive the care they need

Meanwhile, NSW government ministers and parliamentary secretaries will boycott upper house sittings of parliament, essentially thwarting them, over concerns that any meetings could be a super-spreading event.

Chief Health Officer Dr. Kerry Chant wrote to the Speaker of the Legislative Council and later met with representatives of all political parties in the upper house to point out the significant risk of transmission in parliament and the risk of metastasis in regional communities when MPs and staff return home.

The government’s position has been that sessions should be postponed, as done for the lower house, but Legislative Council Speaker Matthew Mason Cox has determined it is appropriate for the Legislative Council to sit down, House Speaker Damien Tudehope said.

“At a time when we are asking everyone in NSW to make sacrifices to keep us all safe, it is principled and dangerous for politicians to reject health advice to pursue their own political agenda,” he said in a statement.

More than 7,245,450 doses of vaccine have been administered in NSW, putting the state at 71.5 percent first dose coverage and 39.5 percent double dose

More than 7,245,450 doses of vaccine have been administered in NSW, putting the state at 71.5 percent first dose coverage and 39.5 percent double dose

“It is important that all community leaders lead by example, which is why ministers and secretaries of state will not sit down until health advice indicates it is safe to do so.”

Under the rules of the Legislative Council, the Senate cannot meet unless a minister is present.

Opposition MPs have argued that the meetings are essential to scrutinize the government’s response to the current outbreak.

Greater Sydney is now on lockdown for ten weeks and the rest of the state for almost three weeks.

The stay-at-home orders will apply for at least another week.

More to come

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.