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Charity calls on gardeners to help slash greenhouse gas emissions

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Green fingers can save the planet! Charity calls on gardeners to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by planting a tree and making compost

  • Royal Horticultural Society urges gardeners to help stop global warming
  • The charity is now launching a major campaign to prevent climate disasters
  • RHS says small actions in the garden can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions










When it comes to rest and relaxation, gardening is often hailed as the perfect hobby.

But green-fingered benefits could be way beyond allotment — because they could even stop global warming, the Royal Horticultural Society has said.

Just as gardeners were urged to dig for victory to defeat the Nazis, the charity is launching a major campaign to prevent climate catastrophe.

The RHS appealed to the UK’s 30 million gardeners and said small actions in the garden can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and encourage wildlife.

The benefits of green fingers could go far beyond the allotment garden – as they could even stop global warming, the Royal Horticultural Society has said

According to the charity’s research, if every gardener in the country planted a medium-sized tree, it would save the CO2 equivalent of driving 11 million times around the planet.

And if everyone produced about 190 kg (419 lb) of compost a year, it would be the equivalent of heating half a million homes.

Other eco-friendly actions include using a rain barrel, switching from peat compost and growing flowers to help bees.

Eating homegrown crops, switching from fossil fuels to electric machines and lifting paving slabs — which would allow exposed soil to grow plants — would also help fight climate change.

If everyone produced about 190 kg (419 lb) of compost per year, it would be the equivalent of heating half a million homes

If everyone produced about 190 kg (419 lb) of compost per year, it would be the equivalent of heating half a million homes

Professor Alistair Griffiths, from the RHS, said: ‘Taken together, the actions of each of our country’s 30 million gardeners can bring about positive change, helping us adapt and mitigate against the climate crisis…

“It’s something we can all do—whether on a windowsill, in our own yard, or with a community gardening group.”

Sue Biggs, director general of RHS, said the charity was “committed” to help fight the crisis. However, she called on the government to allocate more money for research and community gardens and warned: ‘We cannot exploit this potential alone.’

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