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Boris Johnson seeks to extend ‘draconian’ Covid rules until next MARCH

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Boris Johnson tries to extend ‘draconian’ Covid rules until next MARCH in case of winter wave in cases – setting up new battle with Tory backbenchers

  • The provisions of the Coronavirus Act must be renewed every six months
  • Downing Street wants to vote to let them continue until March
  • But such a move is likely to spark anger in Johnson’s backseats










Boris Johnson plans to renew Covid laws for another six months to cover a potential winter surge, preparing for another showdown with lockdown skeptical Tory backbenchers.

The provisions of the Coronavirus Act are to be renewed every six months and Downing Street wants a vote to keep them going until March after parliament returns next week.

But such a move is likely to spark anger in Johnson’s backseat, where many MPs want to prioritize economic recovery.

Some 35 voted against extending the rules in March and as the vaccination program has progressed significantly since then, it is paving the way for a wider uprising when it comes to a vote in the House of Commons later this month.

In March, then-Health Secretary Matt Hancock said it would be “preferred” if the laws are not renewed again.

The provisions of the Coronavirus Act are to be renewed every six months and Downing Street wants a vote to keep them going until March after parliament returns next week.

Mark Harper, the Conservative MP and chairman of the Covid Recovery Group, told the Financial Times that the law contains

Mark Harper, the Conservative MP and chairman of the Covid Recovery Group, told the Financial Times that the law contains “the most draconian detention powers in modern British legal history” and may be dropped.

Mark Harper, the Conservative MP and chairman of the Covid Recovery Group, told the Financial Times that the law contains “the most draconian detention powers in modern British legal history” and may be dropped.

They must be voted on every six months to remain in effect and automatically expire in March after two years.

“Our vaccine roll-out has been a huge success. We have seen a dramatic and welcome drop in people suffering from serious illness and dying as a result,” he said.

“We will have to learn to live with this virus, and maintaining extensive detention powers in the Coronavirus Act does not fit in with that. What justification can there be for extending these measures?’

A government spokesperson said: ‘We will lapse temporary powers in the Coronavirus law where possible, as we have done on previous review points.

‘However, it would be irresponsible to let all temporary facilities expire. This would take away the government’s ability to protect tenants from eviction, provide sick pay to those who self-isolate from day one, and order schools to reopen where necessary, for example.

“The British public would expect us to keep these powers in case they are needed all winter.”

It came as an exclusive new poll for MailOnline revealed that half of Britons believe Boris Johnson is likely to impose another coronavirus lockdown before the end of this year.

The Redfield & Wilton Strategies analysis found that 50 percent of people believe there is still a national shutdown planned in 2021. Only a quarter, 25 percent, believe a new lockdown is unlikely.

Meanwhile, a majority of Britons, some 60 percent, would support Mr Johnson to take such measures if coronavirus cases skyrocket.

The prime minister said he wanted the country’s exit from the latest lockdown to be “irreversible”.

Any attempt to re-impose Covid-19 curbs would spark an outrage from backbench Tory MPs.

The poll of 1,500 people, conducted from September 1-2, found that 16 percent of people believe a new lockdown is very likely this year.

About 34 percent believe a shutdown is likely, 18 percent believe it is unlikely and seven percent believe it is highly unlikely.

The figures suggest a majority of the nation would support the prime minister to take such a step if the scale of the infections called for it.

About 26 percent of respondents said they would strongly support a new lockdown if the number of coronavirus cases increased to ‘significant levels’.

Just over a third, 34 percent, said they would support the move, while 12 percent would oppose it and 11 percent strongly oppose it.

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