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Birmingham hospital doctors terminated healthy baby after mistaking it for sickly twin who also died

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Doctors at Birmingham hospital euthanized a healthy baby after mistaking him for his ailing twin sister who also died, report reveals

  • Incident with Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust
  • Twins found to have fetal growth restriction with higher risk of stillbirth
  • But Doctors Accidentally Aborted the Healthier Twins While Performing the Procedure
  • The case is one of 700 incidents uncovered in an investigation into the Freedom of Information Act










A healthy baby was aborted after doctors mistook him for his twin sister, who also died during the procedure, a report on NHS hospitals in England has revealed.

Surgeons from the Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust performed the procedure to save the healthier twin after the other was found to have stunted growth, increasing the chances of stillbirth and other health complications.

The mother-to-be faced the painful decision to go ahead with the abortion after learning that the healthier twins’ lives were at stake.

Physicians from the Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust terminated a healthy baby after mistaking him for his twin sister, who suffered from stunted growth (file image)

The tragic case is one of 700 incidents uncovered by a Freedom of Information Act investigation, which revealed fundamental flaws that led to deaths, Sunday Express reports.

Other incidents include the death of an unborn baby after a vital heart scan was delayed at Princess Alexandra Hospital Trust in Harlow, Essex, while at North Bristol NHS Trust a patient died after doctors used the wrong part of the gut to create a ​create a colostomy.

The report also revealed the death of an unborn baby after a vital heart scan was delayed at the Princess Alexandra Hospital Trust in Harlow, Essex (stock image)

The report also revealed the death of an unborn baby after a vital heart scan was delayed at the Princess Alexandra Hospital Trust in Harlow, Essex (stock image)

At West Suffolk NHS Trust, doctors sent a patient home after being told they had the flu, but they later died of sepsis.

Meanwhile, a patient at The Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Trust died after not being given anti-embolic stockings despite being at risk of deep vein thrombosis.

Speaking of the tragic death of the unborn twin, a Royal College of Obstetricians and A spokesperson for gynecologists said: ‘In the most severe cases, selective termination may improve the survival rates of the normally grown fetus at the expense of the severely growth-restricted co-twins.

“However, all such procedures can carry an increased risk of early or complete pregnancy loss.”

A spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists acknowledged that while the procedure could help save the healthy baby, there was an 'increased risk' of pregnancy loss

A spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists acknowledged that while the procedure could help save the healthy baby, there was an ‘increased risk’ of pregnancy loss

dr. Fiona Reynolds, chief medical officer at Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Trust, said: ‘A full and comprehensive investigation was quickly conducted into this tragic case and the findings were shared with the family, along with our sincere apologies and condolences.’

According to the Tommy’s Pregnancy and Baby Loss charity, up to 10 percent of pregnancies are affected by fetal growth restriction (FGR).

The condition occurs when the placenta doesn’t work well enough to provide the baby with the nutrients they need to grow normally, although the reason why this happens isn’t always known.

Sometimes it can be caused by other conditions, such as chromosomal problems or infections, such as cytomegalovirus or toxoplasmosis.

Complications can also occur after birth, including: a higher risk of high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, and thyroid disease later in life.

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